DEFEND NEW ORLEANS

americanroutes:

Today’s Featured Archive Spotlight: After the Storm, from Sept. 7, 2005.

American Routes host Nick Spitzer takes you in story and song to New Orleans and the Gulf Coast in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Nick blends music and commentary that describes the place of storms and floods in the history and culture of the city and region. Featured are classic blues about broken levees and broken hearts, celebratory jazz funerals and memories of the city in song. Artists include Louis Armstrong, Mahalia Jackson, Fats Domino and Randy Newman among others. Also tales of hurricanes past in Cajun music and a visit with the leader of a Cajun rescue flotilla, Lafayette, LA public radio station manager Dave Spizale. 

(via nolanews)

weareconstance:

The Ogden Museum of Southern Art presents Mississippi Photographs, 1860s-Present. It takes a look back at 150 years of the state’s history and natural beauty through the lens of thirty-one photographers. The exhibition closes September 17th.
images from show: Maude Schulyer Clay 1983, Kathleen Robbins 2007 and Jack Spencer 1995.
weareconstance:

The Ogden Museum of Southern Art presents Mississippi Photographs, 1860s-Present. It takes a look back at 150 years of the state’s history and natural beauty through the lens of thirty-one photographers. The exhibition closes September 17th.
images from show: Maude Schulyer Clay 1983, Kathleen Robbins 2007 and Jack Spencer 1995.
weareconstance:

The Ogden Museum of Southern Art presents Mississippi Photographs, 1860s-Present. It takes a look back at 150 years of the state’s history and natural beauty through the lens of thirty-one photographers. The exhibition closes September 17th.
images from show: Maude Schulyer Clay 1983, Kathleen Robbins 2007 and Jack Spencer 1995.

weareconstance:

The Ogden Museum of Southern Art presents Mississippi Photographs, 1860s-Present. It takes a look back at 150 years of the state’s history and natural beauty through the lens of thirty-one photographers. The exhibition closes September 17th.

images from show: Maude Schulyer Clay 1983, Kathleen Robbins 2007 and Jack Spencer 1995.

Cinema Treasures: Saenger Theater

1940s postcard showing a night view of the Saenger

The Saenger Theatre in New Orleans was the flagship of several Saenger theaters throughout the South, and the New Orleans theater was the largest of them all, seating 3,400. Built in an Atmospheric style by Emile Weil, the Saenger cost over $2.5 million to construct, and its opening in 1927 celebrated with a parade attended by thousands along Canal Street.

Its cavernous auditorium’s ceiling, like other atmospheric theaters, was painted dark blue, and sprinkled with constellations over which clouds drifted before a show began. Its side walls were designed to look like a Renaissance Italian villa’s courtyard, with plaster archways, doorways and statuary decorated with greenery. 

The enormous proscenium arch was heavily decorated by plasterwork, coated with gilding, and in a cartouche in the arch’s center, a shield with the letter “S” in it, surrounded by a plaster wreath.

A large crystal chandelier hangs in the marble and gold filled main lobby, one of a dozen that once hung throughout the Saenger. However, to finance its upkeep and renovation over the years, the other eleven have since been sold off.

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